Monday, December 11, 2006

King Kong's Dong


We drove over to Arches National Park expectin to find a McDonalds. We drove all over that place fer hours and never could find one! That is down right misleadin to call a place Arches National Park and not have a McDonalds in it if you ask me. We told that to a ranger feller and he jus laughed at us!

The West aint wut it seems it outta be.

But we did see lots of strange rocks tho and every rock had a name. They had all these little signs by the road a tellin you the names of all them rocks.

They all had names cept this rock. Wonder why?

Me an Mabel thought bout it fer a long time and figured that this rock didnt remind folks of anything so they couldnt figure out wut to name it. Or maybe folks just didnt see it and wuz lookin past it at the mountains over yonder. Might as well call it King Kong's Dong for all I know.

Hey thats it! King Kong's Dong! We gonna mail the park peoples a letter a suggestin this name. If yall have any good IDs fer a name fer this rock just send em in and we will give them to the Arches National Park peoples.

9 comments:

Anonymous said...

What a riot.........are you demented or real?

Buck Nekid and Mabel Wonderful said...

I reckon we beez real. But we beez a little teched in the haid too.

Dont ferget to send in a name fer this rock tho.I reckon a national campaign to name this rock would be a good thing cause it is the only rock in the park wif no name.

Buck Nekid and Mabel Wonderful said...

Do you reckon that rock shows that God is Jewish?

I donno myself. Some feller suggested it could be proof of that fer some reason.

I bet the injuns thought it was big medicine.

Anonymous said...

If there was a vote for the name, I would have to say I would vote for the name you so aptly named it.

No doubt, both Jews and Indians would have thought, and probably still do think, that this rock formation is BIG Medicine. Really BIGGGGGGGGGGGGGG Medicine.

Hendon Harris said...

This is exactly what it looks like. However, that fact is vigorously denied by those who don't want it to be so.
Phallic symbols just like this are found in several locations in North America just as they are found in multiple locations in Asia. Google: "Phallic Symbols North America". Symbols just like this one are symbols of fertility that are common in all Vedic religions which originated in India. Even today these symbols play a significant role in Buddhism, Shintoism and all other Vedic/Asian based religions such as Hinduism where this symbol is known as the Shiva Lingam. Don't just take my word for it. Use your search engine and check it out for yourself. However to accept this as fact you will then be admitting that North America was NOT first visited by European "discoverers" as is now taught by scholars who have a vested interested in promoting Eurocentric interests. If you doubt this then why is the
most common wedding ceremony among Native Americans today the Seven Vow Seven Step Wedding
Tradition from India where it has been practiced for thousands of years. Or why is the Manji (swastika) a
sacred symbol in Hinduism and Buddhism used by the
Hopi and Navajo tribes of the Pacific Southwest. In Sanskrit the ancient language of India Manji literally means "Whirlwind". Is it then a mere coincidence that
the Navajo word for this symbol is "Whirling Logs" while
the Hopi word for this same symbol is the exact meaning which it has in Sanskrit which is "Whirlwind". If anyone
can believe this is a coincidence then they can believe
anything. Google: "Were the Anasazi People Buddhists"
and "Mandalas Manjis Mantras and Monuments".

Hendon Harris said...

This image can be seen in person at Arches National Park when you go to "Double Arches" at the park. You don't even have to get out of your car. You can see it from the parking lot. Its just one of several Phallic Symbols there. However, right there at the "Double Arches" within a stone's throw of the Phallus is what I believe is a Persian Manticore also in clear view of the parking lot but
rarely noticed because its not supposed to be there either. You can see images of all three sides
of the "Manticore" at this site.
Google: "The King Arches National Park" or "Persian Manticore North America" There's a lot more to American history than is being taught.

Hendon Harris said...

Speaking of strange rock formations-
Have you been to or seen pictures of
the rocks at the Bisti Badlands wilderness area? Google: "Bisti Badland Images" and in particular
"Bisti Badlands Petrified Log Images"
Why are almost all of the petrified logs
in the Bisti Badlands on elevated sandstone platforms if these formations are in fact natural? One thing is an absolute certainty. That is
that these scores of elevated petrified
logs are not random. This is a definite
PATTERN here in at Bisti. I have located only one such log at the Petrified Wood National Forest in Arizona and its so unusual there that
it has been named "Pedestal Log
Blue Mesa". At Bisti almost all of them
could have that description. Buddhists, Hopi and by extension the
Anasazi venerate petrified wood as a
sacred wood. I believe that these
elevated petrified logs are not random
at all but were elevated manually by
design to be honored there. What about the enormous weight challenge? The Gandhara culture that
had the talent to carve "King Kong's
Dong", the Persian Manticore as well
as Delicate Arch at Arches National Park also had the talent and technology to either raise these logs
or do what they needed to do to make
these logs appear elevated.

Hendon Harris said...

Speaking of strange rock formations-
Have you been to or seen pictures of
the rocks at the Bisti Badlands wilderness area? Google: "Bisti Badland Images" and in particular
"Bisti Badlands Petrified Log Images"
Why are almost all of the petrified logs
in the Bisti Badlands on elevated sandstone platforms if these formations are in fact natural? One thing is an absolute certainty. That is
that these scores of elevated petrified
logs are not random. This is a definite
PATTERN here in at Bisti. I have located only one such log at the Petrified Wood National Forest in Arizona and its so unusual there that
it has been named "Pedestal Log
Blue Mesa". At Bisti almost all of them
could have that description. Buddhists, Hopi and by extension the
Anasazi venerate petrified wood as a
sacred wood. I believe that these
elevated petrified logs are not random
at all but were elevated manually by
design to be honored there. What about the enormous weight challenge? The Gandhara culture that
had the talent to carve "King Kong's
Dong", the Persian Manticore as well
as Delicate Arch at Arches National Park also had the talent and technology to either raise these logs
or do what they needed to do to make
these logs appear elevated.

Hendon Harris said...

For an ancient Chinese Vedic Buddhist image of a phallic symbol like the one at the top of this page google:'Danxia Phallic Rock China". For a modern day image in China try "China Sky Pillar". The images are a significant part of all Vedic India religions and culture and have been since ancient times. For other examples of these huge symbols in Utah google: "Bust.com Rock Hard Penis" and "Whaweap Hoodoos by Tanya". When you get to Tanya's site go to the images section and look for the two toned phallus there. These
formations ARE NOT the result of random erosion. These are the ruins of an ancient civilization in North America who worshiped
reproductive organs as a part of
their fertility rites. We may not
have been taught this but facts are facts and the truth is the truth. See "Buddhist Symbols and
Customs North America".